Commenting Policy for This Journal

Alas, alack, and woe is me... 

The spam monsters have won.  Over the past several months, I have tried to limit spam in the comments to this journal.  Despite my best attempts, though, the spam continues to be posted -- often more spam comments than legitimate ones.

Therefore, I am forced to bar comments from people who are not my LJ friends. 

But all is not lost!  If you would like to comment on a post here, and you are not an LJ friend, and you don't care to create an LJ account to become my friend, you can comment on my main website, the one that mirrors to this journal.  That website is


Mindy, regretting that it's come to this, but pleased to finally get rid of the obnoxious spam

Where’s Mindy?

Mindy is currently working on meeting a number of writing deadlines.  Therefore, her blog is temporarily on hiatus.

Mindy continues to post regularly (usually, every day, sometimes multiple times a day!) on Facebook.  She also visits Twitter often.  Please stop by those places to visit with Mindy until her blog returns.

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

A Lost Weekend

Wow, is it Monday already?  I feel like I’ve been living in a warped zone of time, where days mistakenly drop away from my calendar, without explanation or warning.

In other words, I’ve had a cold for the past week.

We spent Presidents Day weekend up at Gifford Pinchot State Park in Pennsylvania, huddling inside a modern cabin as the temperatures dipped into the single digits.  (One morning, we woke up to the textbook definition of a “dusting” of snow — about half an inch that covered all the existing snowbanks and ice slicks with a beautiful, pristine layer of white.)  The time was perfect for catching up on reading, and for being disconnected from the online world.  (Although there’s cell phone connectivity, there’s no wifi in the park.)  Alas, it was too cold and too icy to do much hiking, even on the very easy paths.  More time for reading!

icicles3

We drove home last Monday, cleverly meeting the park’s required check-out time of 10:00 a.m. and arriving at our house about two hours before a snowstorm.  Those five inches proved enough to shut down the federal government (Mark’s employer) and the local schools (providers of my Tuesday-morning exercise class), so we enjoyed an additional day of vacation.  At home, of course, we also enjoyed the added attention of the local felines, each of whom staked claim to a lap and protected it with great ferocity.

And then began the loss of days.  I came down with a head cold on Monday — nothing serious, but a wonderful excuse for sleeping.  And sleeping.  And sleeping some more.  I got *some* work done (editing two chapters of JOY OF WITCHCRAFT — gotta get ready for that August release!) but mostly I drank Day-Quil and Ny-Quil, and provided a stable bed for the kitties.

Then another weekend happened.  Another weekend with another five inches or so of snow, this time followed by a nice glaze of freezing rain.

I know we’re not getting weather anything like our poor friends in New England.  But the snow and ice we’ve gotten is more than enough to complicate life here — especially when we had massive melt-off yesterday, followed by a precipitous drop in temps today.  The world outside my door is pretty much a skating rink, and it looks like it’ll stay that way for several days.

I hate ice.

I hate slipping on ice.

I live in terror of falling on ice.  (Not so much the fall.  The resulting broken bones, concussions, etc.)

Yuck.

At least I’ve been amusing myself with one thing:  Of the two cats in the house, the greatest challenge (by far) is Poppy.  She is an extremely strong-willed cat, with firm ideas about where she should be when, and what we humans should be doing to serve her.  She makes writing a challenge, because she refuses to settle on a lap (why take a nice, warm, cat-trap-blanket-covered lap, when there’s a keyboard in use so nearby?)

But when we got Poppy from the shelter, about six years ago, we decided that she’d been owned by a family of consumptives.  She *hates* when people cough.  In fact, she’ll leave food, her favorite scratching toy, her warmest lap, even a keyboard-in-use, if someone coughs.  And when one or both of her humans have colds, her sensitivities are heightened.  She’ll take her leave as soon as one of said human takes a deep breath (presumably, preparatory to coughing.)

I’m trying very hard not to use my knowledge for evil.  But if I just happen to take a deep breath and if that just happens to send the cat upstairs to the guest room, where the sun is streaming in the window, and if I just happen to be able to get more work done…

Well, that benefits everyone, right?  I’m not cruel for testing her responsiveness.  Right?  Right?

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Tags:

Over the weekend, I read an article in my college alumni magazine about campus efforts to battle “effortless perfection.”  For those unfamiliar with this relatively new buzzword, “effortless perfection” is the impression that someone is handling a challenge perfectly, without any visible effort.  It’s the old ‘don’t let them see you sweat’ work ethic, where people (often women, often minorities, often people who are supposed to be grateful for the status they’ve achieved) are encouraged to hide all of the frustration, fear, and hard work that lead to stellar accomplishments. The article discussed numerous campus initiatives to debunk the myth of effortless perfection, including the creation of safe discussion groups where students could admit how hard they find the balance of their academic and social lives to be.

While I’d never heard of effortless perfection, I’ve spent decades getting to know its sibling, “impostor syndrome.”  With impostor syndrome, people who have achieved greatness fear the day when they’ll be unmasked as impostors.  Lawyers, for example, dread being revealed as people who do not automatically know the answer when a client presents a problem.

Every female lawyer I ever worked with admitted to suffering from impostor syndrome, back when I was practicing law.  (To be fair, there were some women — mostly successful senior partners — with whom I never had this conversation.  And as I sit here typing, I can’t remember ever having the impostor chat with a single male colleague.)  When we felt safe, comfortable, able to share, we all agreed that we weren’t quite sure what we were doing in our legal practice, that we were just waiting to be unveiled as impostors who had no right to pull down the salaries we did, who had no right to win a coveted seat among the partnership.

We were terrified someone would see us sweat.  We had utterly bought into the culture of effortless perfection.

Some of those impostors — many of them — went on to highly profitable careers in the law.  They made partner, or they became in-house general counsels, or judges or high-powered lobbyists.

Others of us chose other professions. I became a librarian, where one of the great joys of my professional life was to say, “I don’t know the answer to that, but I have many ideas about where to look.  I’ll get back to you.”  Later, I became a full-time writer, where I get to say, “I don’t know the answer, but I’ll create it, right here, out of the fanciful ideas swirling through my brain.”  Both careers gave me a chance to exorcise the impostor, to truly work with less effort, less perfection expected.

And yet…

I suffer bouts of self-doubt. I wonder whether a particular manuscript will find a home in traditional publishing. I question whether my promotional plan for a novel is the best it can be. I watch fellow authors succeeding at X and Y and Z and I wonder why I even try to compete, because my books will never be as good, never be as recognized as theirs.

It’s the impostor syndrome stirring again.  And you rarely read those concerns here, or on Twitter, or on Facebook, because really, who wants to read the second-guessing of someone who is supposed to entertain.  Writing, especially writing full-time, is a dream come true. It’s a reward for years hard-worked.  It’s a joy and  a pleasure. Why would anyone show the blood, sweat, and tears to get here?

Bottom line:  I curate my contacts with the outside world. I don’t tell you every time I have a headache, or when the blues have set up residence in my head for a day or two, or when I didn’t sleep well, or any number of other things that prove my life is less than perfect.

In part, I don’t tell you those things because they’re boring — we all have headaches, and the blues, and lousy nights’ sleep some of the time.

But I also don’t tell you those things because I want you to think of me as a fun author, as a person you want to spend time with, as a person who truly enjoys her life and the stories that she tells.  Because that’s true — I do enjoy my writing life — despite the headaches, the blues, the lack of sleep.  Why make you think about transitory negative things when the overall scheme of things is positive?

So, am I perpetuating the myth of effortless perfection? Am I subjugating my impostor fears, with the possibility that I make other authors’ impostors raise their own nasty heads?

Or am I following through on the promise I make to my readers, the promise of every fiction author on some level — to entertain?

I don’t have any answers. But I’m asking myself more questions than usual these days…

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Tags:

And So, 10,000 Calories Later…

As you know, Bob and Bobbette, I write full time. I set my schedule each day, determining how to accomplish the writing that must be done, balancing that with the administrative work generated by a career that consists mostly of self-publishing. I don’t have to report to a day-job; I don’t have an external boss.  (Okay, there’s a pretty forceful orange kitty, but I still control the bag of treats.)

writers-retreat-logo

Given that life of relative leisure, that schedule of general luxury, why would I ever want to go on a writer’s retreat? Isn’t a retreat really a form of busman’s holiday? A way to take my work and stretch it over more days, more nights, more hours?

Well, yes and no.

Last weekend, I went on a writers’ retreat with three other writers. (There was supposed to be a fifth person at our little getaway, but alas, family crises intervened…) I was “hosting” the retreat; however, my home is too small to host so many dedicated writers. Therefore, I was responsible for feeding three other writers, from Friday evening through Sunday lunch. (I also volunteered to do pre-retreat bed-making and post-retreat laundry, but the actual physical-space hostess declined my offer.)

First, the retreat allows me to socialize with other writers. We get to trade stories — about what we’re working on, about which writers we’ve recently met in person or online, about new developments in traditional- and self-publishing, about the crazy, constantly changing business we choose to call our own. We talk when folks arrive at the retreat, and we talk at meals. We talk at impromptu mid-morning and mid-afternoon breaks. We talk when we’re ready to knock off work in the middle of the night.  There’s a lot of talking, even though most of us are relatively introverted people.  (A lot of the talk involves actual meals or improvised snacks, hence the title of this blog post…)

Second, the retreat allows me to write. Yes, I have my own schedule, and I get my own writing done at my own desk in my own office in my own home. But when I’ve committed to traveling 1.5 hours away to write, when I’ve taken a weekend away from family to write, when I’ve carved out days on my calendar, protecting them from other events, to write, then I know I have to actually, you know, write. This past weekend, I generated about 25,000 new words. They aren’t perfect. I left myself some blanks that I’ll need to fill in later. I know I’ll have to add more to some scenes and take some away from others.  But I produced close to one third of a novel in three days, and I’m quite pleased with that output.

Third, the retreat allows me to think. I spent a little more than three hours in the car, driving up to and back from the retreat. Those hours work a bit like time spent in the shower or time swimming (without nearly as much wrinkled skin to contend with!) — my writer-brain is freed to work on plot snarls, on subplot structure, on the rough places where I know the novel still isn’t working. After arriving home, I knew that I needed to revisit two earlier scenes in the book, making clear their connection to the main plot, strengthening the complementary power of the subplot.

I fully expect to pay for my retreat.  (Sure, there’s the economic payout — gasoline and food. I mean the real cost.) That bossy orange kitty didn’t let me out of her sight last night. And I’m typing around her purring little body this morning.

But I’m incredibly lucky. I don’t have to “pay” my spouse for my retreat. He never makes me feel guilty for abandoning him, for walking out on a weekend when he had to wrangle cats alone, when he was stuck by himself for hours and hours and hours. (Yes, I know that he enjoys his own down-time. But I take the choice away from him when I choose to go on retreats.)

And so, 10,000 calories later, I’m rolling up my sleeves. I’m back to work on JOY OF WITCHCRAFT. I’m throwing new obstacles in Jane Madison’s path. Because that’s what writers do. We write. (And eat and talk and eat and plan and eat and outline and eat…)

How about you? How did you spend your weekend?

 

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Tags:

Lessons from an Off-Season Beach Vacation

We added a day to the already three-day weekend last week and headed down to the Outer Banks, in North Carolina.  A relative owns a gigantic “cottage” there, a beach house that’s intended to sleep around 20.  We’ve found that we love, love, love going down there in the heart of winter, when the vast majority of businesses are boarded up and the beach is deserted as far as the eye can see.  Some lessons learned on this trip:

47-OuterBanksBeach

  • It really is better to remember the keys to someone else’s house before you’ve driven 1.5 hours.  Through rush-hour traffic. Paying for the use of the toll-based express lanes.  (When you finally remember the keys that are hanging on the hook at home, be grateful that the cottage has a keypad entry system, designed for summer guests who arrive after hours.  Don’t bother driving back for the keys.)
  • The weekend following New Year’s Day really is the weekend when most places shut down for the season. Don’t have your heart set on any favorite restaurant. Don’t hold your breath for any particular store. That’s not why you went to the Outer Banks, anyway.
  • The restaurants (and movie theaters) that are open are going to be crowded.  Very crowded. Plan ahead, if you have time constraints.
  • Heat really does rise.  When you’re staying on the third floor of a huge cottage, with only the heater for that floor turned on, you will shiver when you walk down to the lower floors. Take a jacket when you go to inventory the bed linens in the lower rooms.  Really.
  • Sand is much more firmly packed in cold weather, especially after a day of solid rain, than it is in the summer. Plan on walking a lot farther along the beach. But you probably still won’t get to that pier, the one that seems to move farther away with every step you take.
  • No matter how thoroughly you think you cleaned your shoes, you’re going to track sand into the house. A lot of sand. Really. Even when you thought you’d knocked off every last grain. Just plan on sweeping it up — it’s easier that way.
  • There are few things more enjoyable than curling up on a comfy couch, beneath a warm quilt, sipping from a mug of hot tea, reading a RITA-submission romance novel in the middle of a driving rainstorm.

We had a wonderful break. But it’s oh so hard to get back into the rhythm of working! Of course, with a book release next Tuesday, I don’t have a lot of choice…

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Tags:

2014 in Review

There’s nothing like coming back from vacation to make a person all think-y and reflective and introspective.  Or, um, maybe it’s the calendar change-over doing all that…

I started off 2014 with major plans for my career.  I planned on publishing nine books (the Diamond Brides Series) during the year — I had 3.5 of them written on January 1, so I still had 5.5 to go.  I also thought I’d throw together a few omnibus editions, just to keep things fun.  Of course, in the world of indie-publishing it’s not enough to write the books — I also needed to take care of covers, formatting, uploading the books at various vendors, and promoting the work.

And, Reader, I’m thrilled to say:  “I did it.”

What’s more, I enjoyed it.  I found out that I loved writing my short, hot contemporary romance novels.  I truly enjoyed creating the heroes’ points of view, and I reveled in the challenge of making each story unique (not just the bedroom scenes, but the characters’ motivations, the plot conflicts, etc.)  I contracted out the work on cover design, but I did all the rest of the production work, designing and implementing systems along the way that will help with all my future writing.

I underestimated the amount of work, especially with preparing the omnibus editions for publication.  They present some special challenges in production (page numbering, for example, and larger file manipulation), and they require the same level of publicity and promotion that individual books take.  I correctly estimated the physical toll of writing more than half a million published words — my back is fussing with me, and my hips, too, and I accumulated about ten pounds I didn’t have when I started the year.

I also wasn’t prepared for the effect that Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited program would have on my success.  I refused to participate in KU because it requires exclusivity; I want to sell my books in stores other than Amazon.  As a result, I saw a huge cut to my sales, beginning in July when the “all you can read” program was launched.  From speaking with other authors, I’ve concluded that KU has most deeply affected romance writers, and its impact seems even greater upon relatively short works with relatively low price points.  By tracking the trajectory of my sales prior to the launch of KU, I estimate that I lost between 50 and 75% of the sales I would otherwise have seen.

Nevertheless, 2014 was a successful year artistically, emotionally, and financially.  I increased my income approximately 60% over the preceding year (when my target was to increase my income by approximately 40%.)  I made the USA Today Bestseller list, a title that I’ll be able to claim for the rest of my publishing career.  I worked with some incredible authors on joint projects (most notably the Playing for Passion boxed set.)  I met new readers who continue to brighten my day with comments and posts about my work.

On a personal note, it’s been a good year, with lots of joy at home, good times with friends, fantastic plays and museum exhibits and books and films to keep me entertained, and many excellent conversations along the way.  There’ve been some sad notes — cancer stalked too many of my friends, greedily taking its last toll just this morning.  Each of those deaths has left me more resolved to do more, to see more, to accomplish more in the time I have.

So 2015 should be an exciting ride.  I have five books scheduled for release — a free sampler containing the first chapters of many of my other works (The Mindy Klasky Sampler, in stores January 27), a non-fiction book on writing (The Rational Writer, in stores May 26), a new Jane Madison novel (Joy of Witchcraft, in stores August 4), and two more works waiting for titles and specific release dates.  I look forward to more time with friends, both in person and online.  And I can’t wait to see what stories evolve, the ones I’m not even expecting.  Yet.

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Return From Paradise (Costa Rica Edition)

::waving madly::  I’m back!  (Yeah, yeah, with all the holiday craziness, I know you were barely aware I was gone!)

About three years ago, my parents decided that they wanted to take the family on a big extravagant trip to mark their fiftieth anniversary.  My father, who missed a career as a stellar travel agent, did a lot of investigating and a ton of planning and we all intended to meet up in Costa Rica.  Alas, events intervened, and the trip was modified (to an amazing vacation in San Diego, but that’s another story.)

This year, my parents each celebrated major birthdays, and the Costa Rica plans went back on thet able.  My father did a lot of new investigating and began a ton of new planning (with plenty of input from my mother, of course, and a few chimes from my brother, me, and our spouses.)  Costa Rica was back on the table.

And so I’ve just returned from ten days of eco-tourism in perhaps the most friendly country I’ve ever visited.  We flew in and out of the capital, San Jose, but we spent most of our time in nature preserves, all the while staying in luxury resorts.  Our first stop was Si Como No, a hotel carved out of the rain forest near the Manuel Antonio National Park.  The view of the Pacific Ocean from our bed:

SCN

In the park, we saw tons of wildlife — capuchin monkeys and sloths, along with iguanas, sloths, bats, sloths, crab-eating raccoons, sloths, raccoon-targeted crabs, sloths, giant grasshoppers, etc., etc., etc. and a whole host of man-high flora that I’m used to seeing only in tiny four-inch containers at my local nursery, neatly labeled “Tropical: Keep indoors”.

Capuchin  Sloth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We took a flat-bottom-boat tour of the mangrove swamps and learned all about the ecosystem there  (and yes, came face to face with more capuchins, including an alpha male that climbed on the roof of the boat to stake his claim to our domain.

Mangrove

We transferred to a resort at the Arenal Volcano, where we suffered through yet another terrible view from a hotel room that was nearly as large as our townhouse.  This place had planted gardens, with walkways and pagodas and swimming pools and spas.  From there, we attempted zip-lining (I bailed after a practice run, but some people in our party did the whole 2-mile course!), and we took a “safari float”, finding howler monkeys, more new-to-us birds, and a GIANT orange iguana that looked like he’d just time-traveled from the Jurassic.

Arenal

We returned to San Jose for Christmas Day and enjoyed a fancy-shmancy dinner at our hotel.  On our last full day in Costa Rica, we went to a coffee plantation and learned all about harvest and production of coffee.  Back at our hotel, we had curbside seats to the Horse Parade (five hours of drinking in the almost-new year :-) ), and we wandered through the Central Market and other downtown streets.

I feel as if I’ve been away for months — a sensation that should last until tomorrow, when I roll up my sleeves and tumble right back into writing.

So?  How about you?  What did I miss in the past ten days?

(All pictures courtesy of my husband, as I haven’t downloaded my photos yet!)

 

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Tags:

Pre-Christmas Book Notes

Just a couple of quick notes in the pre-Christmas flurry of deadlines and craziness!

1.  Before there was Diamond Brides, before there was Fright Court, I wrote a series about a genie who grants wishes to women who work in the professional theater.  The books are light, and each one is completely self-contained; you don’t need to read them as a series.  Why am I telling you this now?  Because the first one, ACT ONE, WISH ONE (previously released as HOW NOT TO MAKE A WISH), is now available ***free*** from most sellers of ebooks.  Go on.  Take a chance.  Download your free copy and read it today!

2.  Also available today — the last of the Diamond Brides books, TRIPLE PLAY III.  Technically, this is the last *three* of the Diamond Brides books, available in an omnibus edition.  You can read FROM LEFT FIELD, CENTER STAGE, and ALWAYS RIGHT, all for the low, low price of $7.99!  Available at most sellers of ebooks!  (There’s also a print edition; I’ll add those sales links shortly…)

I hope that the holiday season is keeping you happy, and just the right amount of busy!

Happy reading!

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Mourning Meg Patterson

Yesterday morning, I learned via Facebook that Meg Patterson died.  I first met Meg over thirty years ago.  I hadn’t seen her in twenty-five years.  And yet, her death (from metastatic breast cancer) still shocked and surprised me.

I met Meg my freshman year of college, at an informational meeting hosted by Princeton’s Program of Theater and Dance.  Meg was directing David Rudkin’s play ASHES (about a couple’s attempts to bring a child into their family.)  She needed a stage manager, and I’d stage managed plays in high school.  In short order, Meg had convinced me to stage manage her production.

images

Meg was a magical being to me.  She was an upperclassman, while I was a mere freshman.  She lived in alternative university housing, a hippie-like communal home, where the residents did all their own cooking, managed all their own household disputes (on a campus where the *vast* majority of the student body either ate in university cafeterias or in fraternity-like eating clubs.  She followed the rules that made sense to her and broke the ones that didn’t, and she always, always, always was true to herself.

A handful of stories about Meg ring crystal clear in my memory.  She traveled to Ireland before her junior year (at a university and a time where no one took a junior year abroad.)  She and her boyfriend, David, supported themselves busking on the streets.  Meg told me that she’d brew a pot of tea in the morning by throwing a fistful of tea leaves into the teapot and adding hot water.  Throughout the day, she’d add more hot water but no more tea — she was on a strict budget.  By bedtime, she was drinking pure hot water, without caffeine to keep her awake.  Meg knew it was time to come back to the States when the cup of orange juice she’d set on the window sill to keep cool overnight was frozen solid in the morning.

When Meg and I had our first meeting about my stage managing ASHES, she invited me to dinner at her co-op house.  I asked what I could bring (feeling so very grown-up), and she said, “A bottle of wine.”  I was under age and had never bought any alcohol before, but I traipsed up to the liquor store in Palmer Square, and I bought a bottle of Blue Nun, because that was what I’d seen advertised on TV.  Meg made stir-fried vegetables that night. As she held the container of coarse-ground black pepper over the wok, the cap came undone, and the entire contents of the jar spilled into the vegetables. We laughed, and I waited for Meg to toss out the ruined food and start again, but she shrugged, took a spoon, and ladled out most of the pepper.  We weren’t about to waste a perfectly good wok-full of veggies.

In one scene of ASHES, the husband is carrying dishes offstage, and he drops them, shattering them. Meg wanted the realistic sound of pottery shattering each night, so she encouraged me to raid the scrap heap from the University’s sculpture classes.  Sure enough, there were lots of discards there, and we collected enough plates, vases, and bowls to smash up for the run of the play.  One one of those scrap-scrounging trips, I found a glazed bowl the size of my palm; it still holds paper clips and assorted oddments on my desk, and I think of Meg every time I look at it.

Meg and I were vastly different people. We remained friends after ASHES, working on a couple of other shows, hanging out in the lobby of the Theater and Dance building, eating Thomas Sweet’s ice cream from next door. I helped her with some statistics classes she needed to complete in order to earn her sociology degree, way back in the days when we did batch computer processing and needed to retrieve printouts from the distant computer center on campus.

After Meg graduated, we fell out of touch.  We saw each other at the wedding of her former boyfriend, a guy I’d dated for about thirty-seven seconds while they were on a break. I occasionally caught hints of her professional theater career on the west coast.

While I considered a professional career in stage management *very* briefly, I knew fairly early on that I would not pursue that course.  Instead, I used what I learned as a stage manager in other aspects of my life.  I still carry Band-aids and a sewing kit in my purse at all times, and I always have pen and paper. Actors and traveling troupes are featured in nearly every series I’ve ever written, and I made Kira a stage manager in Act One, Wish One.  Habits I built with Meg live on in my bones.

She friended me on Facebook a few years ago as she was grappling with her diagnosis of breast cancer, and I read her updates on a regular basis.  She was a vehement supporter of all efforts to lead clean, chemical-free lives, and she despised all pink-ribbon awareness campaigns.

I wasn’t surprised when I read that she had died Sunday morning; she’d been in hospice for several days. She died surrounded by family and friends. She was a different person than the Meg I knew thirty years ago, but in all the key ways, she was the same person.  I’ll lift a glass (of something better than Blue Nun!) and remember her…

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Why Retreat When You Can Write Full Time?

Last week, I drove two hours north to the Pennsylvania woods, where I rented a cabin with Maria V. Snyder for a week-long writing retreat.

dcnr_001672

I suspect some of you are wondering why I’d do something crazy like that.  I mean, I have the luxury (and the responsibility) of writing full time.  Why spend a total of four hours in the car to go to a place where I need to carry in bedding and pots and pans and food, all to write, just like I write at home?  (For reference, I’ve written an article about writing retreats — how to set them up and why do do them — here.)

Short answer:  It’s not just like at home.

For one thing, I’ve driven two hours to get there, and I’ll drive two hours to get home, so there’s a time cost to going there.  Far more importantly, there’s a family cost to going there — I’ve left behind my husband and our cats, upsetting human and feline schedules alike.  I’ve turned my world and the world of those I love upside down.

So I damn well better be productive while I’m there.

In an ordinary week, when I’m writing at full speed, I produce 15,000 words of solid first draft.  Those words aren’t perfect, and there will likely be fairly substantial revisions in specific language, but the plot is set and the general sequence of events and the backbone of the writing.

In the four full days of the retreat (Monday through Thursday, plus a few hours on Sunday after I arrived), I drafted almost 30,000 words.  That’s one third of the new Jane Madison novel, JOY OF WITCHCRAFT.  Those words are more likely to survive editing than my usual words because they were written quickly, in close proximity to each other.  (I find that I do my best writing fast.)

In addition to drafting all those words, I also built a Scrivener file that contains all the Jane novels in one large project.  That file makes my writing vastly more efficient — I can search one file to see if I’ve used a name before, or to track down the characteristics of a crystal or an herb,  or to recall the name of a spell.  It took  me a few hours to do the work (see, Sunday evening), but the labor will benefit me for all the Jane novels to come.

Usually, I alternate writing time with breaks — taking long walks in the woods, heading down to the lake, etc.  On this retreat, alas, it rained *buckets* on Monday.  And then on Tuesday, the temperature didn’t get above 25.  (I took a short walk, but I headed back when the wind nearly blew my frozen ear lobes off my head.)  On Wednesday and Thursday, the words were flowing and the temps were still glacial, so I kept my head down and wrote, wrote, wrote.  On Friday, before we left, I did take one relatively long walk, but it was mostly a chance to say goodbye to the site.

Maria, I’ve discovered, is a great retreat-mate.  We keep very different hours.  I wake up relatively early, write a chunk in the morning, break for lunch, write a chunk in the afternoon, break for dinner, write a chunk in the evening, then go to bed around 11:00.  She wakes up much later (around my lunch time) and she works must later (till 3 or 4 in the morning.)  Therefore, we both have “alone time,” the same way that we have “together time.”  It works out well.

I have two other retreats already scheduled in the new year — mini-retreats that last a weekend and take place at the homes of writer-friends.  I’m looking forward to them, to the socializing, to the discussing business, to the short intense bursts of writing.

But I’m also already planning my next retreat in the woods.  Because I’ll have another third of a book to get drafted.  I always do.  :-)

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Not Dead Yet

Not dead.  Not carried off by the camelback crickets that insist on taking refuge on the ground level of our home (and some of them are HUGE this year!) Not king yet.

But, um, where did the past ten days go?

Let’s see…

We had houseguests visiting from Canada — the charming Julie Czerneda (in the midst of her book launch tour for A PLAY OF SHADOW) and her husband, Roger.  They arrived with flavored coffees (blueberry! maple!) in hand and a ***gorgeous*** matted photograph of a unicorn ice sculpture, taken by Roger himself.  We enjoyed long conversations about writing, books, publishing, politics, music, travel, and I don’t know what else.

Julie and Roger were in town for the World Fantasy Convention, which took place in a hotel just a couple of miles from our house.  I didn’t attend the con as a member (I’ve been publishing too little fantasy!), but I did hang out in the hotel lobby and bar for two days, visiting with friends and catching up with folks I haven’t seen in far too long.  I also had a chance to meet some Book View Cafe members for the first time in person — I’d love to have a chance to visit each of our co-op members, because communicating face-to-face adds so much more to our online chats!

With Julie and Roger in tow, we went to hear Suzanne Vega play at a small venue in DC.  Stranger to music that I am, I only knew a couple of her songs, but I loved her performance.  Stevie Wonder was playing a huge arena show just a couple of blocks away, and I think we *totally* made the right choice for the evening :-)

I’ve begun outlining my next book, JOY OF WITCHCRAFT, which will be the fifth Jane Madison book.  I’m having a wonderful time getting back into Jane’s world.  Poor librarian-witch! Nothing goes easily for her!

We went to an amazing Smithsonian lecture on Istanbul, taught by Nigel McGilchrist.  Alas, I knew very little about Istanbul prior to the talk, but I learned a great deal of history (and some information about art and food and geology and, and, and, and…)  One of the great things about Nigel’s lectures is his ability to fold together so many different disciplines as he speaks.  His slides illustrate his points beautifully, and he speaks without notes, making everything feel very real and immediate.  And now, alas, I have more travel destinations to add to my list :-)

And I’ve been preparing for a writing retreat next week.  I’ll be stealing away with Maria V. Snyder.  We’re heading off to a state park, where we’ll rent a cabin (just as the first major blast of arctic air is set to hit the region!)  I intend to get about a third of a novel written while I’m there — and to have great conversations about writing, publishing, etc.  (Maria and I keep somewhat different schedules — I wake up early and go to bed before midnight; she wakes up after noon and works until the wee hours of the morning.  That gives us both some “alone time” to get a lot of work done and some “social time” to talk.  A great arrangement!)  I’m generally very productive on retreats — I have to justify taking the time away from Mark and the cats!

So, that’s the past.  And I’ll be scarce for the next week.  But after that, I hope to be back in the usual swing of things!

What about you?  How’s the autumn treating you?  Tell me something wonderful about November!

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

In the End, It’s ALWAYS RIGHT!

Sigh.  The World Series is over, and there’s no baseball to watch on television (until spring training starts — in five short months!)  I knew I’d be mourning the end of the season (even if I couldn’t predict how early my poor Nationals would have been out of the running…) And so, way, way back, when I first started planning the Diamond Brides Series, I knew the last launch would come shortly after the Series wound up.  One last jolt of baseball for the year…  One last visit with the team — the Raleigh Rockets — we’ve come to know so well.

So, this is it!  ALWAYS RIGHT launches today!

Klasky-AlwaysRight200x300

ALWAYS RIGHT is the book I thought of, when I first imagined writing the Diamond Brides.  I knew exactly how Kyle Norton behaves; his superstitions were my very first inkling about the Raleigh Rockets.  Here’s what that tiny seed grew into:

Teetering on the brink of success as a patent lawyer, Amanda Carter is courting financial disaster. She’s juggling her family’s crippling medical expenses and a huge payment to join her law firm partners – nearly impossible burdens because her father stole her identity. If she doesn’t pay up and win her current case, everything she’s worked for will crash to a humiliating end.

Easy-going right fielder Kyle Norton is mired in the worst hitting slump of his career—until a black-haired beauty in the stands offers him her sunglasses. Slump broken, superstitious Kyle is convinced Amanda is the key to the championship his team so desperately wants to win for its dying owner.

Kyle needs Amanda to give him her glasses at every game. Amanda needs to bury herself in work and win the lawsuit—if she can find the money to buy into the firm. Soon, Amanda and Kyle are locked in battle, united by need and consumed by passion. In the end, only one can be always right.

ALWAYS RIGHT costs just $2.99.  You can buy your copy from your favorite vendor:  Amazon Kindle | Apple iBooks | B&N Nook | Book View Cafe | Kobo. A print edition will be available shortly.

So, what do you say?  Ignore the autumn for a day!  Buy ALWAYS RIGHT!  And send the baseball season off in style!

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Can’t Blog. Brain is Full.

Well, I’m back!  (Did you notice I was gone?  Please say you noticed I was gone!)

index

I just spent five days in St. Petersburg, Florida, attending the 2014 Novelists, Inc. conference.  I knew I was in for something good when I looked at the program and there was at least one panel that interested me in every single time slot (sometimes two or three!)  And I suspected I’d enjoy the conference when I saw the resort hotel, with its white sand beaches.  And I was pretty sure I’d enjoy at least the *meals* when I saw the elaborate menus for every conference meal.

But I hadn’t counted on how much I would learn. And how many ideas I’d have, sitting and listening to others. And how many new projects would start to tempt me, as I traded thoughts with other professional writers.

I’ve been to lots of conventions — tons of World Fantasy, lots of Worldcon, a healthy handful of RWA Nationals.  But this is the first conference I’ve ever been to that ran like the librarian and lawyer conferences I used to attend — career furtherance, from keynote address to final thoughts.

It’s also the first convention where I live-tweeted some of the sessions.  Yes.  Me.  @MindyKlasky. #Ninc14.

Pardon me, now. I’ll be over in the corner, revamping my massive to do list.  Don’t laugh.  That’s what I’m calling that massive scroll of a document!  To do.  Sometime before I die :-)

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

My Own Private World Series

So, the World Series starts tonight.  I’m still mourning the fact that my Washington Nationals aren’t in it (although I’m relieved that I don’t have to juggle watching the Series with attending the Novelists, Inc. conference that starts tomorrow!)

I’m marking the Series in my own special way — with the publication of more Diamond Brides books!  First up — TRIPLE PLAY II, the omnibus (three-in-one) collection of the middle three Diamond Brides novels.

Klasky-TriplePlayII200x300

Here’s what you get:

Second Thoughts: In an unexpected reunion, career-driven second baseman Nick Durban discovers that he is the father of photographer Jamie Martin’s six-year-old daughter, but Jamie can’t trust the ex-fiancé who walked out on her years before.

Third Degree: Chef Ashley Harris and third baseman Josh Cantor are competing in a cooking reality show, and the flames in the bedroom roar even higher than the ones in the kitchen.

Stopping Short:  Bad-boy shortstop Drew Marshall will be cut by the team unless widowed spin doctor Jessica Barnes manages to save his career — a tall order after a well-intentioned teammate announces Drew and Jessica are engaged.

All for just $7.99!  You can buy your copy from your favorite vendor:  Amazon Kindle | Apple | B&N Nook | Book View Cafe | Kobo   A print edition will be available shortly.

And it’s not just TRIPLE PLAY II that’s hitting the electronic shelves today.  CENTER STAGE is now available direct from its publisher, Book View Cafe.

Klasky-CenterStage200x300

Book View Cafe is a professional authors’ publishing cooperative offering DRM-free ebooks in multiple formats to readers around the world. With authors in a variety of genres including fantasy, romance, mystery, and science fiction, Book View Café has something for everyone. Book View is good for readers because you can enjoy high-quality DRM-free ebooks from your favorite authors at reasonable prices. Book View  is good for writers because 95% of the profits goes directly to the book’s author. Book View  authors include New York Times and USA Today bestsellers; Nebula, Hugo, and Philip K. Dick Award winners; World Fantasy and Rita Award nominees; and winners and nominees of many other publishing awards. If you haven’t checked out our website before, take a peek today!

Now, let’s play ball!

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Yet Another @Kobo Sale!

Once again, Kobo is having another sale!  This one runs from October 17 – 19, and some of my books are available with *major* discounts!

CATCHING HELL — now 25% off!

FROM LEFT FIELD — now 35% off!

TRIPLE PLAY I (the first three volumes of the Diamond Brides Series) — now 50% off!

There are three different promo codes for this sale, and three lists to purchase from.  Start at the  front page of the sale, and order using the promo codes listed there.  It’s as easy as one, two, three!

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

What a Way to Celebrate!

Well, I’m a year older now.

Okay, technically, I’m a day older than I was yesterday, and three days older than I was on October 12, my official birthday.  But you know what I mean.

Sand Fence and View.img_assist_custom-349x233

This year, we decided to take advantage of a relative’s kind offer, and we spent my birthday (and a long weekend!) at the beach — Duck, North Carolina, on the Outer Banks.  We typically go down there once or twice a year, usually in the heart of winter.  Duck is a wonderful place off season — nearly deserted, with most businesses closed up tight, with nearly no one on the beach, and with cold, bracing winds that can howl all night in classic nor’easters.

Not so much in mid-October this year!

The temps were in the 80s — I dramatically overpacked for cool weather and just got by with the T-shirts I brought (and I mourned my failure to bring shorts or sandalsl!)  On Saturday, the beach was actually *crowded*, and there were lots of folks on the sand every day.  All the businesses were open (even the Dairy Queen :-) ), and the roads were surprisingly busy.  In short, “our” Duck looked completely different from the Duck we normally encounter.

Of course, it was enjoyable, all the same.  We took walks on the sand (with surprisingly high tides and lots of waves!), and we indulged in meals at our favorite restaurants.  We got a lot of reading done, and we watched a lot of movies — binged the second half of HOMELAND, Season 3, and the BEYOND Linklater movies, and an odd, well-made little film called A SIMPLE PLAN.

All in all, a perfect birthday weekend, brightened by the Facebook posts of many, and emails from even more, and cards and phone calls and, and, and, and…  I feel well and truly spoiled!  (I also feel like I’m never going to eat anything other than salad and lean grilled meats, for the rest of my life :-) )

And that is why it’s time for me to get back to work :-)

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Tags:

Urgent! Hurry! Act Now!

Tomorrow (October 14) is the last day EVER when you will be able to buy Playing for Passion, the USA Today bestselling boxed set of ***twelve*** sports-themed romances, all for just $0.99.

PlayingForPassion2D200x300

The set includes the first volume of my Diamond Brides series, Perfect Pitch.  You know you want to read these books.  So get out there and buy your set today.  Because by Wednesday?  It’ll be too late!

Buy now:  Amazon | B&N | iBooks | Kobo

 

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Well, this is rather odd.  I have two books releasing today, and I don’t think it’s possible for any author to have two more different books hitting the market simultaneously.

Darkbeast Rebellion

First up:  DARKBEAST REBELLION, by Morgan Keyes (that’s, um, me.) This is the paperback version of my middle grade fantasy novel, second in the DARKBEAST series.  Here’s the back-of-the-book blurb:

Keara, her friend Goran, and the wily old actor, Taggart, are fleeing for their lives. They have all spared their darkbeasts, the creatures that take on their darker deeds and emotions and lift their spirits. But their actions defy the law, which dictates that all citizens must kill their darkbeasts on their twelfth birthdays.

There are rumors of safe havens, groups of people called Darkers who spared their darkbeasts and live outside the law. To find the Darkers, the trio must embark on a dangerous journey—and evade the Inquisitors who are searching for them everywhere. In the middle of winter, freezing and exhausted, Keara and her companions are taken to an underground encampment that seems the answer to all their hopes. But are these Darkers really what they appear to be?

DARKBEAST REBELLION is a steal, at $7.99 in paperback.  You probably won’t find this book in stores — Barnes & Noble declined to carry it in physical stores for unknown reasons.  (Rumor has it, they didn’t like the story of a girl who rebels against the religion of her parents.) But it’s widely available online:  Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

Klasky-CenterStage200x300

And then there’s my second release for the day…  CENTER STAGE.  That one’s by Mindy Klasky, and it’s the eighth volume in the Diamond Brides Series.  The back of the book blurb tells you what it’s all about!

Actress Lindsey Ormond has always followed the rules – be nice, keep quiet, and never, ever get involved with a bad boy. But her good behavior has yielded lousy results – she was just left at the altar for the second time in two years.

Raleigh Rockets center fielder Ryan Green keeps life simple – play ball, have fun, and keep an eye on his recently widowed father. When Ryan attends Lindsey’s disaster of a wedding, another sizzling task hits his to-do list – help Lindsey learn how to break the rules.

Before long, Ryan is showing Lindsey just how much fun she’s been missing – in the bedroom and beyond. But Lindsey’s brother Zach (part of the Rockets’ management team) disapproves of their new relationship. And Zach just offered Ryan’s father the job of a lifetime.

When the conflict moves center stage, will Ryan choose Lindsey? Or will his obligations to the Rockets and his father send Lindsey back to her stifled life alone?

If you like stories about jilted brides, about guys who fall in love with the kid sister of their good friend, about good girls learning how to be just a little bad, then this one is for you!  You can read a sample here:  http://www.mindyklasky.com/index.php/books/passion/diamond-bride-series/bookspassiondiamond-bride-seriescenter-stage/

And you can buy CENTER STAGE here:  (Amazon Kindle | Amazon Print | Apple | Createspace Print | Kobo) (More links coming soon!)

So? What are you waiting for?  It’s time to get reading!

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

So, This Happened

It’s been a crazy week or so. I completed edits on ALWAYS RIGHT (the last volume of the Diamond Brides Series), only a couple of days later than I planned back in February. I drove up to Baltimore and participated on two panels at the Baltimore Book Festival with the Maryland Romance Writers. I attended the Crafty Bastards craft show and bought more yarn than any human being should buy (also enjoying a great lunch with a close friend I never have enough time to see.) I enjoyed lunch with my cousin, catching up on all sorts of family stories.

And, oh yeah.  I BECAME A USA TODAY BESTSELLING AUTHOR!!!

Screen Shot 2014-10-01 at 9.32.56 AM

Ahem.  I hit the list with PLAYING FOR PASSION, the limited time collection of twelve sports-themed romances that includes PERFECT PITCH (the first volume of the Diamond Brides Series.)

I am over-the-moon thrilled with this recognition.  PLAYING FOR PASSION is a great set, and eight of us authors had never been on any national bestselling list in the past.  You can buy the collection until October 14.  After that, it disappears forever!  (Amazon | Apple | B&N | Kobo)

Mirrored from Mindy Klasky, Author.

Latest Month

April 2015
S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Syndicate

RSS Atom
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Tiffany Chow